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Sculpted Light Project: The Element Series

Client: Private Commission

Worldwide

Artwork, Visual Research, Materials and Manufacturing R&D

Sculpted Light: The Element Series

Light is ephemeral.  In literature it is intertwined with space and time.  Innumerable artists express its essence in relation to color, texture and the perception of space:  Robert Irwin, Bill Jacklin, Hans Hofmann, Vera Lutter, Douglas Wheeler, Helen Frankenthaler, Andrey Tarkovsky, John Constable (skies), and James Turrell, to name a few.  In film light can appear as a passionate protagonist, a momentary entity that takes over reality to amplify a subjective experience, a journey, or the likes.

How does light relate to infinity?  The speed of light intrigues.  If you look carefully when light interacts with water you will see that white light is made up of waves of many different sizes.  The shortest wavelength we see as violet and bends the most.  The longest wavelength is perceived as red and bends the least.  All other colors fall in between these two.

Light is one of our greatest natural resources.  When the electricity goes out, we depend upon it.  We harness power from its source for solar energy.  We see what life is like when light is blocked by ash-filled skies from climate change-induced forest fires, and our current infrastructure is not designed for these extremes of climate change.

Sculpting in time:  as part of our Element Series, we first look at natural light as a medium – its pattern, texture and and interaction with color, shapes and materials.  With this ongoing work we combine artistic creativity with sculptural expression and pragmatic research.  Most memorable spaces feature natural light to its greatest potential.  Common structures deserve the same.  It’s easy to put in a skylight, but this is an artistic journey for the future.

Digital Photography, Silver Gelatin Prints, Paintings and Model Maquettes by Michelle LaFoe, copyright 2021. Materials and manufacturing R&D by OFFICE 52 Architecture.

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R&D Case Study: 2020 Fast Company Innovation by Design
R&D Case Study:  Nanoscience and Dichroic Glass
R&D Case Study: Glass and Bird-Friendly Pattern
LaFoe: Osaka Museum of Contemporary Art
Campbell: Washington National Airport Public Art Program
Campbell: Virginia Tech Creative Arts Center Study
LaFoe and Campbell: Chubu Teiju Culture Center and Museum
About Looking Series